I like big butts and I cannot lie!

It’s Saturday, June 22. Football season is 10 weeks away. And two friends just had new babies. So this afternoon, we’re watching some U20 Soccer and Atlanta Braves baseball on the patio. And in the meantime, I have a ridiculous 8.39 lb bone in Boston Butt cooking away on the Egg. This also gives me the chance to play with my new camera. Exhibit A:

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Ingredients:
Yellow mustard
1 bone-in Boston Butt

Prepare butt for the Egg:

1. Remove the pork butt from the packaging. Run cold water over the meat. Blot dry with a paper towel.
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2. Place butt, flat cap up, on a sheet of cutting board and rub mustard over the surface of the meat.
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3. Liberally apply your spice rub to the meat. Make sure to work the seasoning into notches in the meat.
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4. Flip the butt over. Apply mustard and rub liberally to the other side.
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5. Wrap in aluminum foil. Put the meat back in the fridge and let sit overnight.
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Prepare the Big Green Egg:

1. Overfill the fire bowl with natural lump charcoal. Add in wood for smoke. Today is an all hickory sort of day. I typically use chunks, but today I used chips. Since I used chips, I soaked them for about an hour before throwing a couple handfuls on the first immediately before adding the meat. Go ahead and pull the butt out of the fridge, put it in your V-Rack and place your temperature probes if you’re using a probe thermometer. Cover the setup with a paper towel.
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2. Start the fire.
3. At about 220 degrees, I started to close down the vents. I’m trying to cook this at a dome temp of 250F.
4. Once the fire is stable and you’re close to your intended temperature, open the Egg and add the platesetter, inverted, for indirect heat. Put down a drip pan. Add about an inch of water to the drip pan. This will effectively cause your grill to magically hang out at an important temperature range between 205 and 215F until the all of the water evaporates. Your dome temperature may read as much as 30 or 40 degrees warmer, but the BBQ probe on my BGE ET732 wireless thermometer cannot tell a lie.
5. Close the grill and allow the preheated grill to bring the platesetter and drip pan back up to temperature.
6. Add a couple handfuls of soaked hickory chips. You can use the ash tool to move these onto the coals.

Add the butt to the Egg:

1. Open the Egg. Take the butt, fat cap down, on the V-Rack and and place it in the drip pan.
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2. Close the lid. Stay with the grill until it returns to your target temp. Make sure your temperature stays stable for 30 minutes or so before you leave it unattended.
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After 4 or 5 hours, you should hit a temperature plateau:

1. This plateau exists from about 140F to about 175F. I planned to hit this plateau at about noon. Due to evaporative cooling, you may see your temperature stay stable or actually drop a few degrees during this period. Don’t panic and don’t open up your vents to “push through this.”
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2. Check the thermometer.
3. At this point, the meat is no longer taking on smoke and magic is happening to the fat and collagen inside.

Coming out of the plateau:

1. Eventually, you’ll come out of the plateau and your temperature will begin to rise quickly again. At this point, if you need to open the vents and raise your cooking surface temp to 300-350F, it’s OK. My cook took about 11 and a half hours.
2. I laid out two sheets of aluminum foil. And put a fresh towel in the dryer to spin and get warm.
3. Pull the towel out and load it into the cooler to begin warming.

The rest:

1. Remove the meat between 185F and 200F.
2. Wrap tightly in two sheets of aluminum foil. Pull towel out of pre-warmed cooler. Wrap towel around the butt.
3. Let rest in the cooler. There are two phases to this rest. The first phase is resting, wrapped in the foil. The second phase is to open the foil and let it continue to rest. Plan for both phases of this rest to take at least an hour (total time).
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Pull or shred the meat:

1. Grab the shoulder bone. Twist and pull. It should come out with little effort.
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2. Who needs forks when you own a pair of Meat Claws? This was effortless.
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Eat:

1. Serve on white buns. With cole slaw and the sauce of your choice. Dill pickle slices optional.
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2. My three friends who came over for the afternoon ended up able to take food home to their families and I still have leftovers.

2 Responses

    1. My wife’s stepdad built it as a birthday gift. He used the plans located at BigGreenEgg.com . He rounded the edges, used pressure treated lumber and found decking screws that matched the wood stain. This is the Large table with a Medium Egg.

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